In Conversation: LogOut

logout

It is by now, of course, no secret that the ongoing situation in Greece is not entirely favourable, but as we have found out over the course of the year, hope is still present. It’s a topic that has remained at the forefront of our site since we launched, and one which fascinates us. In the UK, we haven’t exactly been exposed a great deal to the goings on in Athens and the rest of Greece, and as such it’s hard to resonate with the Greek public when we aren’t privy to their thoughts and reactions.

It is by now, of course, no secret that the ongoing situation in Greece is not entirely favourable, but as we have found out over the course of the year, hope is still present. It’s a topic that has remained at the forefront of our site since we launched, and one which fascinates us. In the UK, we haven’t exactly been exposed a great deal to the goings on in Athens and the rest of Greece, and as such it’s hard to resonate with the Greek public when we aren’t privy to their thoughts and reactions.

Search deeply enough and you’ll find a menagerie of talented and impassioned Greek musicians, using their craft to either combat the societal turmoil they are faced with, or to disconnect from it altogether. We’ve heard from KU, Keep Shelly in Athens and Mockbirth in regards to the parts they play, whether it be attempting to inspire optimism or providing music for those who are most affected, and in contrast, the incensed, dark music of Ruined Families rears its head to stare conflict in the face. LogOut however, a solo artist who earlier this year released his second full-length, would say that if his music has been influenced by this Greek upheaval, it’s been subliminal.

“Most songs on Little Things Buried in Concrete were written two to five years ago. Only the last three songs were written within the last two years, possibly encapsulating some of the ongoing tensions,” he told us. “It is important though not to make songs that are just tweeting about ongoing things, but trying to see the more permanent characteristics of situations, as songs should be functional for a longer period.” So, though the thematics of his album may seem to correlate with tensions in Greece, it seems more rooted in artistic license, and of the analogies that can be drawn from such. “The songs are also buried in the concrete of a robust production; the immediacy of the bare songs is hidden. Concrete, as a material, also hides behind a serious appearance all joy, anxiety or whatever else could be taking place during a building’s construction and operational years.”

“It was also what naturally flowed, from the experimentation with various instrumentations along with Hristos Lainas.” Lainas, a labelmate of LogOut’s at the formidable Inner Ear Records, began making guitar pop music in 1996 and has since gone on to collaborate with various others, as well as providing music for Greek films. For the last decade, he has lent his hand as a producer for many artists, and his influence on LogOut seems to have been critical.

“It is important to make songs that are not just tweeting about ongoing things, but trying to see the more permanent characteristics of situations, as songs should be functional for a longer period.”

“Working with Lainas was a great experience, as usually the same things sounded okay to both of us and we had the same tendencies to experiment and speculate different ways towards the completed songs. Being part of Inner Ear’s efforts is certainly an important and honoring fact, given the great names that the label has in it’s roster. It has been a great motivation to do things a bit more close to complete statement, and not succumbing to the initial tendency for spontaneous uploads of all produced material.”

The name ‘LogOut’ comes with associations of disconnect – removing yourself from the constraints of an assumed identity and (re)discovering your true self – and combined with the anonymity that LogOut works from, it’s a fair conclusion to suppose that his music comes with that centralised theme of living outside of boundaries. But, as the man himself explained to us, there’s not always an inference to be drawn from a name. “The sense usually given to ‘logout’ always had to do more with questioning the limits of one’s identity, the things that really define this identity and what happens when such elements are, instantaneously or permanently, losing significance for ones self. A current inside meta-joke is that even the above thought has actually partly lost its significance for the project over time, and so the word ‘logout’ is now mostly thought of as a word that means nothing. That’s a liberating thought.” Even with this shedding of expectation from the name, it’s still clear that there is an overarching want to step away from the barriers created by a self-imposed identity.

It’s worth noting too that LogOut’s portrayal of anonymity isn’t a gimmick in the same form as, say, Daft Punk or SBTRKT. His live performances are very much inclusive, with the people themselves influencing the directions that his songs may take. “The live versions always find their own ways of starting, manifesting themselves and ending, ideally taking into account the ongoing vibe at each place-venue and, of course, the instruments available. This of course means that things can go horribly wrong, but mistakes are usually the nicest parts in shows, aren’t they?”

It’s clear that LogOut’s music serves the people and is moulded by them, and when posed a question about possible collaborations for the future, he mused that: “Interaction between ideas from different sources is something that’s missing in the LogOut project. A recent idea, to address this issue, was to loop people who attend the shows and make something out of it, if there are volunteers of course.” It doesn’t get much more involving than that. The name ‘LogOut’ may have slowly developed into just a moniker, but ultimately, the project is about coming together; the union of people and ideas, and trumping adversity.

It is now safe to turn off your computer.

You can keep up with LogOut’s spontaneous uploads and his future direction at http://lo-gout.tumblr.com

Isaac Powell
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Isaac Powell

Isaac is Editor-in-Chief of Noted, and prefers his music loud and steaks rare. Lives and writes in Nottingham, England.
Isaac Powell
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